LOVE+like
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fiercefatfeminist:

abbygubler:

If you’re mad at her, you don’t understand it.  White people are trying to remove themselves from all people of color.  Let me show you why this is true.  You’ve heard of Asian-americans or African Americans or Mexican Americans.  But how about a European American?  Have you ever heard someone say they’re Canadian American? or European American? Probably not.  White people can just call themselves American, even if their ancestry has not been in America for long.  If your great-grandparents moved because of the potato famine, you don’t call yourselves Irish American, you have lived your entire life in the United States, you call yourself an American.  But now, take someone whose ancestry is linked to some of the first slaves in the colonies, and they still call themselves African-American.  Doesn’t matter if they’ve never stepped foot on the continent and share no cultural link, other than pigment, with any society in Africa, they still have to identify with African.  
What’s most infuriating is that even people who are the ultimate Americans: Native Americans.  They were in the Americas while ass backwards Europe was accusing (and burning) women of being witches.  THEY, of all people, shouldn’t have to specify their identity as an American, but NO they have to be labeled with something else.  
Raven Symone is an absolute star.  She has my total respect for standing up like this, and I hope her so much happiness with her girlfriend.  I wish she was still on television, she taught me so much , even if it was all from a disney show


YUP
fiercefatfeminist:

abbygubler:

If you’re mad at her, you don’t understand it.  White people are trying to remove themselves from all people of color.  Let me show you why this is true.  You’ve heard of Asian-americans or African Americans or Mexican Americans.  But how about a European American?  Have you ever heard someone say they’re Canadian American? or European American? Probably not.  White people can just call themselves American, even if their ancestry has not been in America for long.  If your great-grandparents moved because of the potato famine, you don’t call yourselves Irish American, you have lived your entire life in the United States, you call yourself an American.  But now, take someone whose ancestry is linked to some of the first slaves in the colonies, and they still call themselves African-American.  Doesn’t matter if they’ve never stepped foot on the continent and share no cultural link, other than pigment, with any society in Africa, they still have to identify with African.  
What’s most infuriating is that even people who are the ultimate Americans: Native Americans.  They were in the Americas while ass backwards Europe was accusing (and burning) women of being witches.  THEY, of all people, shouldn’t have to specify their identity as an American, but NO they have to be labeled with something else.  
Raven Symone is an absolute star.  She has my total respect for standing up like this, and I hope her so much happiness with her girlfriend.  I wish she was still on television, she taught me so much , even if it was all from a disney show


YUP
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"I am a very private person, yet I am an open book.
If you don’t ask…I won’t tell."
(via lindsaylately)
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"Have you ever been watching a movie—let’s say in the theater where you don’t have the ability to rewind—and you miss what’s actually happening because you’re hung up on the last scene, trying to make sense of it instead of actively paying attention? Have you ever missed the significance of a whole scene by dwelling on one that has passed, when the present one plays a vital part in moving the story forward? Doing this is a mistake because you’re pulling yourself out of the narrative that has been strategically crafted to carry you through the story. Every scene matters, so if you dwell on a single one as it proceeds, you will miss out on the art of the film.

So is life I think. I often ask, “who am I and how am I known,” but I think it’s better to ask myself, “who do you want to be,” “what do you want to become,” and “how do you want to be known in the future,” and start doing things in the present that reflect that. It’s no surprise that I often feel stuck or lost. I’m actively avoiding the present and hindering my future when I keep looking over my shoulder without the power to rewind. So instead of hitting replay in my mind to analyze moments that have already faded out, I’m pressing play and taking hold of today because it whispers into tomorrow and hurls stepping stones into the future. I’m going to be present in my narrative, because this scene has a purpose, and I intend to find out what it is so I can be proud of my character development in the pages to come.

"
LB, Rhetoric & Reminders (via yesdarlingido)
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"

“Do what you love” disguises the fact that being able to choose a career primarily for personal reward is a privilege, a sign of socioeconomic class. Even if a self-employed graphic designer had parents who could pay for art school and co-sign a lease for a slick Brooklyn apartment, she can bestow DWYL as career advice upon those covetous of her success.

If we believe that working as a Silicon Valley entrepreneur or a museum publicist or a think-tank acolyte is essential to being true to ourselves, what do we believe about the inner lives and hopes of those who clean hotel rooms and stock shelves at big-box stores? The answer is: nothing.

"

Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. 

other quotes from the article i really like:

"According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace."

"Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life! Before succumbing to the intoxicating warmth of that promise, it’s critical to ask, “Who, exactly, benefits from making work feel like nonwork?” “Why should workers feel as if they aren’t working when they are?” In masking the very exploitative mechanisms of labor that it fuels, DWYL is, in fact, the most perfect ideological tool of capitalism. If we acknowledged all of our work as work, we could set appropriate limits for it, demanding fair compensation and humane schedules that allow for family and leisure time."

(via mercy-misrule)

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"We never say that all men deserve to feel beautiful. We never say that each man is beautiful in his own way. We don’t have huge campaigns aimed at young boys trying to convince them that they’re attractive, probably because we very rarely correlate a man’s worth with his appearance. The problem is that a woman’s value in this world is still very much attached to her appearance, and telling her that she should or deserves to feel beautiful does more to promote that than negate it. Telling women that they “deserve” to feel pretty plays right in to the idea that prettiness should be important to them. And having books and movies aimed at young women where every female protagonist turns out to be beautiful (whereas many of the antagonists are described in much less flattering terms) reinforces the message that beauty has some kind of morality attached to it, and that all heroines are somehow pretty."

You Don’t Have To Be Pretty – On YA Fiction And Beauty As A Priority | The Belle Jar (via brutereason)

this. this. this. this.

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atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!
atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway  by Tomasz Furmanek 
 Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!